Secret Religion

April D. DeConick Religion: Secret Religion Macmillan Reference USA, 2016

Religion: Secret Religion is part of the Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks series dedicated to the study of religion. Composed of twenty-four thematic chapters, this volume looks at the margins of religion or religious texts and traditions that are not considered authoritative by orthodox communities. The volume is broken down into three sections that correspond with different classifications of religion in the margins: gnosticism, with its focuses on knowledge of a transcendent God who is the source of life and the human spirit; esotericism, with its focus on private religion kept from the public and critical of orthodoxy; and mysticism, with its focus on immediate contact with the ultimate reality. Each classification will be explored historically and comparatively to give the reader a more rounded understanding. The volume also includes bibliographies, filmographies, images, a glossary, and a comprehensive index, all of which aid the reader in exploring this rich, rewarding, and relevant field.

Secret religion cover

Contents

Introduction: Religion in the Margins.
GNOSTICISM.
1. Gnosticism Emergent: The Beginning of the Study of Gnosticism in the Academy.
2. Gnosticism Theorized: Major Trends and Approaches to the Study of Gnosticism.
3. Gnosticism Disputed: Major Debates in the Field.
4. Gnosticism Historicized: Historical Figures and Movements.
5. Gnosticism Socialized: Gnostic Communities.
6. Gnosticism Recorded: Text, Scripture, and Parascripture.
7. Gnosticism Imagined: Major Ideas and Perspectives of Gnostics.
8. Gnosticism Practiced: Ritual and Performance.
ESOTERICISM.
9. Esotericism Emergent: The Beginning of the Study of Esotericism in the Academy.
10. Esotericism Theorized: Major Trends and Approaches to the Study of Esotericism.
11. Esotericism Disputed: Major Debates in the Field.
12. Esotericism Historicized: Historical Figures and Movements.
13. Esotericism Socialized: Esoteric Communities.
14. Esotericism Recorded: Text, Scripture, and Parascripture.
15. Esotericism Imagined: Major Ideas and Perspectives of Esotericists.
16. Esotericism Practiced: Ritual and Performance.
MYSTICISM.
17. Mysticism Emergent: The Beginning of the Study of Mysticism in the Academy.
18. Mysticism Theorized: Major Trends and Approaches to the Study of Mysticism.
19. Mysticism Disputed: Major Debates in the Field.
20. Mysticism Historicized: Historical Figures and Movements.
21. Mysticism Socialized: Mystic Communities.
22. Mysticism Recorded: Text, Scripture, and Parascripture.
23. Mysticism Imagined: Major Ideas and Perspectives of Mystics.
24. Mysticism Practiced: Ritual and Performance.

April D. DeConick is Chair, and Isla Carroll and Percy E. Turner Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity, Department of Religion Rice University. Her most recent books include The Gnostic New Age: How a Countercultural Spirituality Revolutionized Religion from Antiquity to Today (2016); Holy Misogyny: Why the Sex and Gender Conflicts in the Early Church Still Matter (2011); and The Thirteenth Apostle: What the Gospel of Judas Really Says (2007, 2009).

James Ingall Wedgwood: Writings

Although not as prolific an author as Leadbeater, Wedgwood wrote a substantial number of works, some of them valuable sources of historical information. Unlike Leadbeater’s works, Wedgwood’s works have generally long been out of print, and some of the most interesting – mainly small pamphlets on controversial subjects – have long been all but unobtainable.

wedgwood-priest

His major works were:

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1913 Meditation for Beginners Theosophical Publishing House, London [CW] – text available on-line at: http://www.katinkahesselink.net/other/wedg_meditation.html 20 editions were published between 1913 and 2011 in 3 languages.

1914 Varieties of Psychism Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar – digital version available on-line at: https://archive.org/details/b29012478

1926 The Distinctive Contribution of Theosophy to Christian Thought, The Blavatsky Lecture 1926, Theosophical Publishing House, London  [CW] Adyar – digital version available on-line at: http://resources.theosophical.org/pdf/Series/Blavatsky%20Lectures/BL_1926_Wedgwood_The_Distinctive_Contribution_of_Theosophy_to_Christian_Thought.pdf

1927 The Place of Ceremonies in the Spiritual Life St Alban Press, London [CW]

1928 The Presence of Christ in the Holy Communion Theosophical Publishing House, London [CW]

1929 The Larger Meaning of Religion Theosophical Publishing House, London, 1929 [CW]

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There have been some published collections of his works.

1976 New Insights Into Christian Worship, Selected Works of J.I. Wedgwood, Vol. I St Alban Press, London

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1984 The Presence of Christ in the Holy Communion and Other Writings St Alban Press, Sydney

JIW collected works

2004 The Collected Works of James I. Wedgwood, D.Sc., St Alban Press, San Diego, 2004; 2nd edition, 2007 This includes:

Introduction

THE LARGER MEANING OF RELIGION

Chapter I. Introductory

Chapter II. What Is Man?

Chapter III. Man and His Pilgrimage

Chapter IV. What Is Religion?

Chapter V. The Scope and Aim of Religion

Chapter VI. An Explanation of Church Worship

Chapter VII. An Explanation of Church Worship

Chapter X. The Holy Eucharist: An Interpretation

NEW INSIGHTS INTO CHRISTIAN WORSHIP

Part I. The Place of Ceremonies In the Spiritual Life

Part II. A New Idea of Worship

Part III. Congregational Worship

Part IV. Church Music

Part V. The Longer and the Shorter Form

Part VI. The Blessed Sacrament

Part VII. Benediction of the Most Holy Sacrament

Part VIII. The Service of Healing

Part XIX. The Ordination Services

Part XX. Various Services

Part XXI. The Symbolism of the Altar

Part XXII. Work with the Dead

THE PRESENCE OF CHRIST IN THE HOLY COMMUNION

Part I. The Presence of Christ in the Holy Communion

Part II. The Distinctive Contribution of Theosophy to Christian

Part III. The Sacraments and the Theory of ‘Economy’

Part IV. Various Subjects

MEDITATION FOR BEGINNERS

Part I. Introduction

Part II. What Meditation Is

Part III. First Steps

Part IV. Concentration

Part V. Meditation

Part VI. Contemplation

Part VII. The Search for the Master

Part VIII. Physical Aids to Meditation

Appendix

THE FACTS REGARDING THE EPISCOPAL SUCCESSION IN THE LIBERAL CATHOLIC CHURCH

Part I. The Sources of the Attacks

Part II. The Consecration of Bishop Mathew at Utrecht in April, 1908

Part III. Our Breach with Archbishop Mathew

Part IV. Bishop Willoughby and the Succession

Part V. A Letter from Bishop Willoughby

Part VI. The Unworthiness of the Minister

Part VII. The Validity of Bishop Willoughby’s Consecration

Part VIII. Conclusion

THE LAMBETH CONFERENCE AND THE VALIDITY OF ARCHBISHOP MATHEW’S ORDERS

Part I. Some Details of History

Part II. The Question of Validity

Part III. The Verdict of the Old Catholic Church

Part IV. The Credentials of the Liberal Catholic Church

Part V. Conclusion

Roman Catholic Opinion

THE BEGINNINGS OF THE LIBERAL CATHOLIC CHURCH

Part I. Beginnings of the L.C.C.

Part II. The Old Catholic Church

Part III. Our Breach with Abp. Mathew

Part IV. The Reorganization of the Church

A detailed table of contents for the 2nd edition can be found at: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=UnCUG-bYPFQC&pg=PR1&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=3#v=onepage&q&f=false

Works listed above and below and marked [CW] are found in the 2nd edition of The Collected Works of James I. Wedgwood, D.Sc.

The lesser known, but more important, works on aspects of the history of the Theosophical Society and, particularly, the Liberal Catholic Church, include:

nd The Facts Regarding the Episcopal Succession in the Liberal Catholic Church author, np [CW]

nd Spiritualism and the Great War Theosophical Publishing House, London

nd Universal Co-Masonry. What Is It? Supreme Council of Universal Co-Masonry for Great Britain, (London), nd

1914 “The Modern Ceremonial Revival”, in The Herald of the Star, March, 1914

1918 “Some Reminiscences of Mr Leadbeater”, in Union Lodge Lectures, (Union Lodge, TS), (London), 1918

1918 “The Old Catholic Church”, in Union Lodge Lectures, (Union Lodge TS), (London), 1918

1918 “The Old Catholic Church”, in Occult Review, June 6, 1918

1918 A Statement Concerning the Order of Corporate Reunion, author, London, 1918

1919 The Liberal Catholic Church and the Theosophical Society. Where They, Agree and Where They Differ St Alban Press, Sydney

1919 Reply to Mr Martyn author, Sydney

1920 The Lambeth Conference and the Validity of Archbishop Mathew’s Orders. An Open Letter to His Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury author, Sydney [CW]

1926 St Michael’s Centre, Huizen author, Huizen, 1926

1926 “The Liberal Catholic Church, Its Doctrinal Position”, in The Liberal Catholic, July, 1926

1926 The Distinctive Contribution of Theosophy to Christian Thought, The Blavatsky Lecture 1926, Theosophical Publishing House, London

1928 A Tract for the Times. An Open Letter Addressed to the Clergy of the Liberal Catholic Church on the Continent of Europe author, Huizen

1929 The Theosophical Society and Kindred Organizations. An Open Letter to the General Council of the Theosophical Society in Reply to a Letter of Mrs Jinarajadasa author, Huizen

1930 “Gaining of Spiritual Experience” in Theosophy, Past and Future: being the four convention lectures delivered in Adyar at the fifty-fourth anniversary of the Theosophical Society, December, 1929 Theosophical Publishing House, Adyar, 1930

1938 “The History of the Liberal Catholic Church, 1. Beginnings”, in The Liberal Catholic, January and February, 1938

1950 “The Old Catholic Church”, in The Liberal Catholic, July, 1950

1951 “The Policy of the Liberal Catholic Church”, in The Liberal Catholic, July, 1951

1966 The Beginnings of the Liberal Catholic Church St Alban Press, Ojai [CW]

Additionally, Wedgwood wrote a number of works on the organ:

1904 Tonal Design in Modern Organ Building Embodying a reply to Mr. R. Mayrick-Roberts … Reprinted from the London “Musical Opinion.” In answer to R. Meyrick-Roberts’ articles “On Modern Tendencies in Organ-Building” published in the same journal London: Houghton & Co., 1904; London: Winthrop Rogers, 1905

[1905] A Comprehensive Dictionary of Organ Stops: English and Foreign, Ancient and Modern, Practical, Theoretical, Historical, Aesthetic, Etymological, Phonetic London: Vincent Music Co., [1905] published as Number 38 in the Schirmer’s “Red Series of Music Text Books”; 2nd edition 1907; 3rd edition 1909; 4th edition [1910]; 5th edition [1911]; 6th edition 1920; 7th edition 1920; 8th edition [1930]. There is some confusion in the numbering of editions because of publication in London and New York: Vincent Music Co, Winthrop Reeves and Winthrop Rogers in London; Boosey and Hawkes, and G. Schirmer in New York; and Boston Music, Boston. Digital version of the 3rd edition available on-line at: https://archive.org/details/cu31924022450831 37 editions were published between 1900 and 2015 in English.

1910 Some Continental Organs (Ancient and Modern) and Their Makers With specifications of many of the fine examples in Germany and Switzerland. London, W. Reeves, 1910, describing the technical specifications of organs in European cities from Haarlem and Aix-la-Chapelle, to Cologne, Stuttgart, Lucerne and Strasburg.

His thesis for the degree of DSc at the Sorbonne was Sur la production du son par les tuyaux a bouche de l’orgue Paris, Editions Rhea, 1921.

For Wedgwood, see also: https://cwleadbeater.wordpress.com/2016/05/28/james-ingall-wedgwood/

For Wedgwood and Leadbeater, see: https://cwleadbeater.wordpress.com/2018/09/13/leadbeater-and-wedgwood/

 

Leadbeater and Wedgwood

The influence of James Ingall Wedgwood on Leadbeater led to a major change in Leadbeater’s occult interests, and the emergence of what can best be described as an obsession with ritual magic. Leadbeater had previously, as he had written, had no interest in Christian or Masonic ritual, but, having been introduced to both by Wedgwood, became preoccupied with them.

JIW and CWL

Just when Leadbeater and Wedgwood first met in this life is not certain, although Wedgwood recalled it as having been in 1906 in the home of a leading English Theosophist, Alfred Hodgson Smith, at Harrogate. See J.I. Wedgwood “Some Reminiscences of Mr Leadbeater” in Union Lodge Lectures (Union Lodge, TS), (London), 1918.

Wedgwood and Leadbeater talked for some time about Gregorian plainchant, and Wedgwood was impressed by demonstrations of Leadbeater’s psychic powers. Leadbeater “looked up” Frederick George Lee (1832-1902), the prime mover in the Order of Corporate Reunion, in the “Heaven World” while preparing for lunch. Wedgwood had some vague associations with supposed continuations of the Order of Corporate Reunion during his early Anglican years.

As Wedgwood commented that “The interesting thing was that C.W.L. could do a piece of work like that while washing his hands.”

Wedgwood and Leadbeater subsequently stayed together in Weiner Hirsch (with Mrs Marie Russak and Mrs Van Hook), at Colmar in Alsace-Lorraine (with Johann van Manen) and in Genoa (with Mr and Mrs Kirby). However, according to Leadbeater’s accounts of past lives, he and Wedgwood had lived and worked in many worlds before this. Wedgwood was known by the “Star Name” of “Lomia” in Man, Whence, How and Whither (1913) when his lives in India, 12,800 B.C. and Peru, 12,000 B.C. were described, and in The Lives of Alcyone (1924) where he featured amongst the leading figures.

The relationship between Leadbeater and Wedgwood, however it was later portrayed by writers from within the movements with which they were involved, was complex and not entirely happy. Wedgwood, who had formal education in theology, liturgy and Church music, regarded Leadbeater’s theological, liturgical and musical knowledge and abilities as somewhat primitive. He was especially critical of Leadbeater’s occult revision of the Eucharistic liturgy of the Liberal Catholic Church which sought to make the rite more explicitly occult, and of Leadbeater’s introduction of explicitly Theosophical material (for example, “The First Ray Benediction”) into the liturgy. Wedgwood found Leadbeater’s contribution to the music of the Liberal Catholic liturgy amateurish.

The two men also held significantly different view about the supposed “Coming” of the Lord Maitreya through the person of Krishnamurti.

For, Wedgwood, see: https://cwleadbeater.wordpress.com/2016/05/28/james-ingall-wedgwood/